Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Portae Inferi Non Praevalevunt

The faith by which we live shall never vary in any age … for one is the faith which sanctifies the just of all ages. ~Pope St. Leo the great
 
Pope Pius XII
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A great safeguard is the entire faith, the true faith, in which neither anything whatever can be added by anyone nor anything taken away; for, unless faith be one, it is not the faith. ~Pope St. Leo the Great
 
Truth, which is simple and one, admits of no variety. ~Pope St. Leo the Great
 
We anathematize those who presume to teach or explain any other creed. ~Pope Vigilius
 
Let nothing of the truths that have been defined be lessened, nothing altered, nothing added, but let them be preserved intact in word and in meaning. ~Pope Gregory XVI

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Pope Pius XII 
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Pope Pius XII
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Pope Benedict XV
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Pope Benedict XV at prayer
 
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If anyone according to wicked heretics in any manner whatsoever, by any word whatsoever, at any time whatsoever, or in any place whatsoever illicitly removes the boundaries firmly established by the holy Fathers of the Catholic Church ... in order to seek for novelties and expositions of another faith ... and, briefly, if it is customary for the most impious heretics to do anything else, should anyone through diabolical operation crookedly and cunningly act contrary to the pious preachings of the orthodox teachers of the Catholic Church, that is, its papal and conciliar proclamations, to the destruction of sincere confession unto the Lord our God, and persist without repentance unto the end: let such a person be condemned forever, and let all the people say: So be it! So be it! ~Pope St. Martin I
 
We declare that no one is permitted to introduce, or to describe, or to compare, or to study, or otherwise to teach another faith. Whoever presumes to introduce or teach or pass on another creed . . . or whoever presumes to introduce a novel doctrine . . . We declare to be anathematized. ~Pope St. Agatho
 
Beyond a doubt, they perish eternally who do not keep the Catholic faith entire and unchanged. ~Pope Gregory XVI
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Pope Pius XII
Pope Pius XII - Jubilee year 1950
Pope Pius XII
Pope Pius XII creating Cardinals
Pope Pius XII
 
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The Church of Christ, therefore, is one and the same forever. ~Pope Leo XIII
 
I accept with sincere belief the doctrine of faith as handed down to us from the Apostles by the orthodox Fathers, always in the same sense and with the same interpretation. ~Pope St. Pius X
 
The proposition that the principal articles of the Apostles' Creed did not have the same meaning for the Christians of the earliest times as they have for Christians of our time is hereby condemned and proscribed as erroneous. ~Pope St. Pius X
 
Those wretches tainted with the error of Indifferentism and Modernism hold that dogmatic truth is not absolute, but relative: that is, that it must adapt itself to the varying necessities of the times and the varying dispositions of souls, since it is not contained in an unchangeable revelation, but is, by its very nature, meant to accommodate itself to the life of man. ~Pope Pius XI
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King Henry IV doing penance before Pope Gregory VII 
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Pope Pius XII imparting a blessing
Pope Leo XIII
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Pope St. Pius V 
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Pope Bl. Pius IX imparting a blessing
Pope Bl. Pius IX
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Pope Pius XI
Pope Pius XI
 
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We are not, therefore, teachers of a doctrine drawn from human minds, but-----conscious of our charge-----we ought to embrace and follow that which Christ Our Lord taught and Whose teaching, by a solemn commandment, He committed to His Apostles and to their successors ... Moreover, since We are very certain that this doctrine which we must safeguard in all its integrity is Divinely revealed, We repeat the words of the Apostle of the Nations: "But though we, or an Angel from Heaven, preach to you a Gospel besides that which we have preached to you, let him be anathema" (Galatians 1: 8). ~Pope Pius XII
 
Pope Bl. Pius IX
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The preaching of the faith has lost nothing of its relevance in our times. The Church has a sacred duty to proclaim it without any whittling-down, just as Christ revealed it, and no consideration of time or circumstance can lessen the strictness of this obligation. ~Pope Pius XII
 
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Pope Pius XI
Pope Pius XII
Pope Pius XII
Pope Pius XII
Pope Pius XII
Pope St. Pius V 
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Pope St. Pius X
Pope St. Pius X
Pope St. Pius X at prayer 
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Pope St. Pius X
Pope Pius XI receiving a gift (a tiara) from the people of Milan
Pope Leo XIII

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

REPORT: Rorate Masses at Holy Innocents (2017)

CHURCH OF THE HOLY INNOCENTS
 
REPORT: RORATE MASSES AT HOLY INNOCENTS 2017

Holy Innocents has scheduled 10 traditional Rorate Masses (all at 6AM) this Advent (2017). It may seem a bit “ambitious” because, you might ask, who in his/her right mind will want to get up at around 4AM in the morning and travel some distance to attend the 6AM Rorate Mass, right?

Well, many of the faithful parishioners at Holy Innocents (and some of their friends) have made the sacrifice to attend several (some have the intention to attend all) of the Rorate Masses – an excellent and very Catholic way to prepare for Christmas!
 
So far, we have had two (2) Rorate Masses and still have eight (8) more to go.
 
The attendance for the Rorate Masses has been as follows:
Monday, Dec. 4 at 6AM – Sung Mass; 45 people.
Tuesday, Dec. 5 at 6AM – Sung Mass; 43 people.
 
For those considering attending any of the eight (8) remaining Rorate Masses, below are the remaining days on which the Rorate Mass will be offered:

·         Wednesday, December 6 at 6AM
·         Thursday, December 7 at 6AM
·         Saturday, December 9 at 6AM
·         Monday, December 11 at 6AM
·         Wednesday, December 13 at 6AM
·         Thursday, December 14 at 6AM
·         Friday, December 15 at 6AM
·         Saturday, December 16 at 6AM
 Below are some photos of the beautiful and inspiring Rorate Masses:

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Monday, December 5th
Monday, December 5th
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Monday, December 5th
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Monday, December 5th
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Tuesday, December 6th

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Rorate Masses in Advent 2017 at Holy Innocents, NYC

CHURCH OF THE HOLY INNOCENTS
RORATE MASSES 2017
 
 
This year, the Church of the Holy Innocents will have 10 Rorate Masses again during the first part of the holy season of Advent. Last year, a good number of parishioners made it their devotional sacrifice to attend as many of the Rorate Masses as they could. This year, the rumor is that their devotional spirit will inspire them to do the same!
 
The Rorate Mass is a traditional Advent devotion wherein the Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary for Advent is offered just before dawn. The Mass takes its title from the first words of the Introit (Rorate Caeli), which are from Isaiah 45:8:
 
     “Rorate, caeli, … Drop down dew, ye heavens, from above, and let the clouds rain the just: let the earth be opened and bud forth a Saviour.”

 
The Rorate Mass is lit only by candlelight. Because it is a votive Mass in Mary’s honor, white vestments are worn instead of Advent violet. In the dimly lit setting, priests and faithful prepare to honor the Light of the world, Who is soon to be born, and offer praise to God for the gift of Our Lady. As the Mass proceeds and sunrise approaches, the church becomes progressively brighter, illumined by the sun as our Faith is illumined by Christ.
 
The readings and prayers of the Mass foretell the prophecy of the Virgin who would bear a Son called Emmanuel.



***The “Rorate Mass” will be celebrated at The Shrine and Parish Church of the Holy Innocents on the following days of Advent:

·       Monday, December 4 – at 6AM
·       Tuesday, December 5 – at 6AM
·       Wednesday, December 6 – at 6AM
·       Thursday, December 7 – at 6AM
·       Saturday, December 9 – at 6AM
·       Monday, December 11 – at 6AM
·       Wednesday, December 13 – at 6AM
·       Thursday, December 14 – at 6AM
·       Friday, December 15 – at 6AM
·       Saturday, December 16 – at 6AM

 

MORE INFORMATION ON THE RORATE MASS
 
Rorate Cæli  are the opening words of Isaiah 14, 8, text that is used both at Mass and in the Divine Office during the season of Advent because it expresses the longings of Patriarchs and Prophets and of the entire human race since the fall of Adam, and symbolically of the Church, for the birth/coming of the Redeemer.

          The Rorate Mass got its name from the first word of the Introit for the Mass of Our Lady on Saturdays during the season of Advent: “Rorate cæli désuper et nubes pluant justum.” (“Shower, O heavens, from above, and let the skies rain down righteousness.”).  The celebration of this Mass by candle light had originally a more practical reason – when there was no electricity. For many centuries in the Church, no Mass was allowed to be celebrated after Noon, and when these Masses were celebrated very early in the morning (before dawn) it was still very dark, especially in winter-time. So, the practicality of the use of candles obtained, in the course of time and through the power of religious tradition, a spiritual meaning (especially in the dark before dawn). Accordingly, the use of candles symbolizes the bright light of Christmas (the Birth of Christ) to which Advent leads us.

          Before the liturgical revolution of the Second Vatican Council, this Rorate Mass was celebrated very early in the morning on all Saturdays, and in some countries (Poland, Germany), during some or all weekdays during the season of Advent. It was celebrated in honor of the Blessed Mother (in white Vestments) as preparation for Christmas, in order to present Mary as the perfect model to imitate throughout the season of Advent.

          Mary teaches us the real spirit of Advent (waiting for the coming of the Messiah); she teaches us the kind of internal disposition that we should have during the season of Advent. During the nine months of pregnancy, Our Lady lived a hidden life, in the spirit of silence and of intense intimacy with Christ.

During the period of Advent, we should cultivate that same spirit of silence and of intense intimacy by listening attentively to God’s message and by obedience to His word, through devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, so that, like the shepherds of Bethlehem, we may always find Jesus through Mary (“So they [the shepherds] went with haste, and they found Mary and Joseph, and the babe lying in the manger.” Lk. 2, 16).

Friday, November 24, 2017

Stat Crux: The Carthusian Life



US Trailer of "Into Great Silence" (documentary on the Carthusian Life)

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A blind Cathusian monk is interviewed

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Grand Chartreuse in 1964

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Carthusian Chant

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Friday, November 17, 2017

Chartreuse: The Queen of Liqueurs - Made by Carthusian Monks

This post on the Carthusian liqueur(s) is offered for the sake of completeness and as a sequel to the post on the Carthusian Monks, since they are the ones who make the excellent liqueur(s). 

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CHARTREUSE: The Queen of Liqueurs
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Monks collecting the herbs needed to make Chartreuse
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Herb room
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Ah, Chartreuse!

Chartreuse is the “mysterious elixir that prolongs life” with its unique green color and is shrouded in secrecy and mystique. This liqueur is made by legendary Carthusian monks, contemplatives of the strictest Order in the Catholic Church. Connoisseurs all over the world are familiar with its very distinctive and mythical taste. This liqueur (one and only in its category) is considered by many “a wonder of nature,” “an unequaled masterpiece,” “peerless,” “a noble liqueur, rich, and satisfying,” a liqueur of which “one knows not how to write all its virtues.” For many, it is also the liqueurfor men who like to play with fire!” Yet, those sophisticated people who have had the opportunity to taste it agree that Chartreuse is much more than that.

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With the revival of the cocktail culture and craft bartending, this iconic liqueur has once again become a favorite. If you haven’t tried it, you must! If you hear someone ordering one “neat,” it is a good bet that the person works in a restaurant/bar. Within the past decade, this Carthusian liqueur has come out of the woodwork and has become the go-to drink for bartenders. “Chartreuse fever” started slowly, but has come on strong, and bartenders have gone from pouring one bottle of Chartreuse a month to four or five a week.
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Aged green Chartreuse
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Chartreuse has a very strong characteristic taste. It is sweet, but it becomes spicy and sharp. You can certainly taste the herbs when you taste it, yet it is also balanced by sweetness; its aroma and flavor are of the utmost complexity. According to many, at first taste, Chartreuse tastes very much like its color – green (herbal/vegetal) – and it is very intense (110 proof!). If you combine half jigger of Chartreuse with two jiggers of gin, your drink will still taste like Chartreuse! Chartreuse has a mystifying flavor that refuses to be conquered.
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Your first whiff of Chartreuse may well leave you dazed, confused, and captivated because you will smell dozens of plants/herbs, which makes Chartreuse so deliciously intriguing. As is the case with other liqueurs, the flavor is sensitive to temperature. If taken straight, it can be served very cold, but is often served at room temperature (we assume that this is how the monks drink it, and it is the most traditional way to drink it).
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Chartreuse transitions in flavors and scents: a sweet licorice, peppermint, and pure black and white pepper notes can be detected. Chartreuse is spicy without being harsh; it is sweet without tasting like candy; and it is a blast of flavor, but never overwhelming. It is always perfectly balanced. Chartreuse is certainly everything other liqueurs try to be, but it stands alone as “the most distinctive liqueur you can serve or give” and one that needs no matches, chemicals, water, or sugar (as other liqueurs might). It is absolutely perfect just the way the Carthusian monks have always made it!
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The Carthusian Order was more than 500 years old when, in 1605 in Vauvert, a small suburb of Paris, the monks received a gift from Francois Hannibal d’Estrées, Marshal of King’s Henri IV artillery: an already ancient manuscript from an “Elixir” soon to be nicknamed “Elixir of Long Life.” This manuscript detailed a blend, infusion, and maceration of 130 herbs, which was so complex that only bits and pieces of it were understood and used. At the beginning of the 18th century, the manuscript was sent to La Grande Chartreuse in Grenoble, where an exhaustive study of the manuscript was undertaken by Frère Jerome Maubec who finally unraveled the mystery.

Then, in 1737, a practical formula for the preparation of the Elixir was drawn up. The distribution and sales of this new medicine were limited. One of the monks of La Grande Chartreuse, Frère Charles, would load his mule with the small bottles that he sold in Grenoble and other nearby villages. Today, this “Elixir of Long Life” is still made only by the Carthusian monks following that ancient recipe. This “liqueur of health” is all natural plants, herbs and other botanicals suspended in wine alcohol – 69% alcohol by volume, 138 proof. This elixir was so tasty that it was frequently used as a beverage rather than as medicine, which led to the adaptation (in 1764) of the ancient elixir recipe to make a milder beverage: this is what is known today as “Green Chartreuse” – 55% alcohol, 110 proof. The immediate success caused the liqueur to be consumed far beyond the area around La Grande Chartreuse.
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White Chartreuse
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When the French Revolution erupted in 1789, members of all Religious Orders were expelled, and the Carthusian monks were forced to leave France in 1793. They made a copy of the manuscript kept by one of them who remained in the Monastery, while another monk was in charge of the original. This monk was arrested and sent to prison in Bordeaux, but fortunately he was able secretly to pass the original manuscript to one of his friends, Dom Basile Nantas. Dom Basile, convinced that the Order would never come back to France and unable to make the Elixir himself, sold the recipe to Monsieur Liotard, a pharmacist in Grenoble. Mr. Liotard never produced the Elixir. When Monsieur Liotard died, his heirs returned the manuscript to the Carthusian monks who had returned to their Monastery in 1816.

In 1838, the Chartreuse distillers developed a sweeter form of Chartreuse: “Yellow Chartreuse” (40% alcohol, 80 proof). In 1903, the French government nationalized the Chartreuse distillery and confiscated the monks’ property, expelling them again. This time, the monks, along with their secret recipe, went to Tarragona, Spain where they built a new distillery and began producing their liqueurs with the same label.  However, an additional label said Liqueur fabriquée à Tarragone par les Pères Chartreux (“liquor manufactured in Tarragona by the Carthusian Fathers.” For eight years (from 1921 to 1929), the monks produced an additional liqueur in Marseille (France). The liqueur from Tarragona was nicknamed “Une Tarragone.” The one from Marseille was then officially called “Tarragone.”
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Summary:
*The gift of the manuscript in 1605
*The Elixir Végétal (138 proof) finally made in 1737
*Green Chartreuse (110 proof) in 1764
*Yellow Chartreuse (80 proof) in 1838
*A “White” Chartreuse (60 proof) between 1840 and 1880; then from 1886 to 1900
*After 1904, the liqueur made by the monks in Tarragona nicknamed “Une Tarragone
*V.E.P. (very prolonged aging) introduced in 1963
*The “Liqueur du 9ème Centenaire” (94 proof) developed in 1984 to commemorate the 900th anniversary of the foundation of the Carthusian Order
*The “1605” version (112 proof in 2005 to commemorate the gift of the recipe by Marshall d’Estrées.
*The “Liqueur des Meilleurs Ouvriers de France” in 2007
* “Génépi” (80 proof)
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All of these liqueurs are made by the monks and are based on that ancient manuscript from 1605. Only two monks are allowed to know the names of the 130 herbs and plants used to make Chartreuse. Eighteen tons of them are delivered to the Grande-Chartreuse Monastery every year. In the “Herb Room,” the herbs and plants are dried, crushed, and mixed in different series and are then kept in a bag carefully numbered and taken to the distillery in Voiron. Each series of herbs and plants macerates in alcohol, and each maceration is then distilled for about 8 hours.

Since the 19th century, the monks have used the copper stills. Most of the distillation of the liqueurs today is done in the stainless-steel stills, which have been designed especially for Chartreuse, in order to enable a very accurate control of the distillation process and, just as important, to allow the monks to monitor the distillation from the Monastery, which is 15 miles away from the distillery.
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Heated by steam, the alcohol and the essence of the plants evaporate to the top of the swan neck, and then are cooled down in the condenser becoming an alcoholate. A last maceration of plants gives its color to the liqueur. A final control is made by the monks before the liqueur can be put to age in the oak-casks of the maturing cellar. Built in 1860 and enlarged in 1966 it is the largest liqueur cellar in the world: 164 meters long. Chartreuse ages in oak casks from Russia, Hungary or France. After several years, the monks will test the liqueur and decide if it is ready to be bottled – only they can make this decision.
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The sales of the liqueurs allow the Carthusians the funds necessary to survive. The fabrication of the liqueur Chartreuse is a great source of revenue and means of support for the monks, and the surplus of their income is distributed in charitable works.
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